WORKING WITH COMPOSITION
Artists who are engaged in painting or graphics, follow the rules of composition, or at least know when they decide to break them. The same goes for the best photographers.…

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EXCURSION TO THE WORLD OF BATIK
There are several types of batik - hot, cold, free painting. They differ in the way the fabric is backed up. As a reserve in hot batik wax is used.…

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HOW TO CONTROL THE SUN?

The setting sun can add a piece of magic and a special mood to the photo. The warm golden glow brings the romance to a completely new and deeper level, you just need to take into account that the photographer is obliged to control the sunlight. Otherwise, nothing happens.
In order for the sun to be present in a photograph, your lens must be directed towards it. This means that the rays of sunlight will have direct access to the inside of the lens, thereby contributing to the creation of a sun flare. He is the beast that can destroy your photo if you don’t know how to tame it.
If there is too much sunlight, the whole photo will become blurred and lose contrast. You should anticipate this blur in the camera when shooting a frame. Ideally, it is necessary that the faces in the frame be clear and not illuminated, while the gorgeous orange sun highlights are in other places of the composition.
An example of a controlled solar flare with a warm glow, in which a good contrast is maintained.
You can use four different techniques to help control the sunlight in your photo.
“Filter” the sun
Position the sun in the frame right at the edge of another object so that only part of the light passes. In this way, for example, you can shoot the sun through the trees or when it is at the level of the horizon. When the sun is partially obscured, the rays are less likely to produce glare, since usually the object or tree also obscures the lens.
You can see in the example below how sunlight seeps through the trees or is partially obscured by the tree line.
Instead of creating the effect of sunlight penetrating something, you can sit in the shadows yourself. The objects of your shooting can be completely open, but only as long as the front of the lens is in some kind of shadow, then the rays will not let the glare appear in the photo.
For example, you can even stand in the shadows of a street pillar or tree to shade the front of your lens. In this way, you can keep your subject entirely in sunlight, and the lens away from direct sunlight.
If you do not have a shadow with which to work, it often helps to eliminate the direct rays in the lens by changing the shooting angle. Remember that they are directed at a right angle from the sun to the lens, so if you change the shooting angle, stand on a ladder or ask your model to sit down, your lens will be pointing down and the sunlight will no longer fall directly on the lens
If the above methods did not work, you can simply try to manually block the sun. Stretch your hand, hold it over the lens, and try to find the angle at which the sun’s rays fall, cover them with your palm.
You will have to shoot with just one hand, but this method is much more efficient than using a lens hood, which is often not long enough to effectively block out sunlight when shooting.
In the example below, you can see a photograph in which the hand of the photographer was too low, but it perfectly blocked the sunlight.
If you successfully get rid of excessive sun flare, you can really approach the photo creatively, using well-designed circular sun glare in your composition, which will especially help in summer time.
Conclusion
Controlling sunlight requires a lot of practice. Try some of the techniques presented at sunset and play a little with the light!

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