TIPS ON UNDERWATER PHOTOS
Underwater photography is fun. This is a great way to combine your passion for diving with a love of photography. Just like exploring “ground” photography, underwater photography is a journey…

Continue reading →

HOW TO CONTROL THE SUN?
The setting sun can add a piece of magic and a special mood to the photo. The warm golden glow brings the romance to a completely new and deeper level,…

Continue reading →

HOW PHOTO INSPIRES TO LOVE SCIENCE AND TO KEEP THE PLANET

Science has the property of circling people’s heads – the more complex it becomes, the more abstract it looks to many. And if you do not make daily constant efforts to study a certain issue, do not understand the subtleties and nuances, the head can be overloaded with information before you can at least somehow become interested in a new development or discovery.
Scientific development first exists for some time, and then later come up with various ways of bringing people closer to the scientific issues involved. Today there are an impressive number of films, videos, podcasts, lectures and exhibitions that are united by the mission of clarifying the questions of science to people.
A wonderful essay by a Brazilian photographer Leonardo Ramos will introduce you to how photography can teach you to love science and take care of the planet.
“When I was very young, I was not interested in science at all. For me it was all boring school material – meaningless words that need to be remembered before exams, and then you can safely forget. I only saw that studying subjects prevents me from playing with friends on the street and watch tv.
Nevertheless, I have always said that I want to become an astronaut when I grow up – one who dresses in a cool suit and looks at cool things outside the Earth, that is, nothing even remotely connected with science. I had a lot of books with exciting space images, I looked at them an infinite number of times. Looking at the images, I did not come closer to scientific knowledge, nevertheless, unknowingly I came to understand the most valuable concept of science: reverence for it and the desire to comprehend it.
While I was at school, my parents constantly took me on walks, but all I saw around me was boring bushes and cold water. That was until my father gave me a camera. She helped me look differently at everything I saw around. My father is a photographer, it was he who taught me his craft, cultivated my interest in science and developed the ability to look at the world from an unconventional angle. So developed my deep admiration and respect for nature.
There are two aspects of photography that may be one step ahead of any other means of communication with science. First, a photograph conveys its message about a natural phenomenon much faster than a film or lecture, when it takes time to understand what it will be about.
A photograph is unlikely to explain how a power plant generates electricity, does not tell about the complicated movements of plate tectonics or natural selection, but it can give the same sense of awe and interest that space images brought to me when I was a child. And it can have a much greater effect than any film, lecture, or something else.
A picture with a magnificent jaguar or a spectacular landscape on the news channel can tell you what no book could ever do: see how amazingly beautiful it is! He exists, he is there! A good photo will not only tell it to your brain, but also show your heart.
It is because of this that scientists and environmental teams are teaming up with photographers. In São Paulo, Brazil, private institutions and non-governmental organizations are making significant efforts to create reserves to protect what is left of the once-huge Atlantic Forest. The world-famous photographer Luciano Candisani (@Luciano Candisani), one of the few Brazilians who have ever received the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year award, has teamed up with one of these institutions – the Vororantim Sanctuary in São Paulo. He has developed a unique photographic method with camera-traps for obtaining images of rare animals, and also conducts workshops for tourists on photography. This is a way to show all the conservation work that is being done there for the rest of the country.
The second undoubted advantage of photography is that anyone can be a photographer. A smartphone is all that is needed to identify a person’s interest in creating images. And, as recent advertisements for Apple’s iPhone show, it is hardly possible to limit the use of the phone as a tool for creating beautiful photos.
The popularity of nature shots on social networks encourages newcomers to go out and take pictures.

MONUMENTAL PAINTING
The term "fresco" is understood to be a letter on the raw limestone base by paints diluted with water or paints having a lime binder (lime mortar, lime water). The…

...

ALFRED EISENSHADT - CLASSIC REPORTING SHOOTING AND AUTHOR OF THE FAMOUS "KISSING ON TIMES SQUARE"
American photojournalist Alfred Eisenstadt is known for his numerous and very talented reportage shots, primarily for Life magazine. Having given over to the profession for more than 70 years, he…

...