Future perspectives of photography and ecology
In 2012, a very interesting Chilean film called “No.” was released. This is a report on the tactics of advertising used during the 1988 referendum, when Chileans decided whether dictator…

Continue reading →

HOW TO REMOVE BLACK AND WHITE STREET PHOTO
There is no more classics than black and white street photography. Old street photos enliven the nostalgic images of Andre Cartes, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Duano and many others. Why black…

Continue reading →

HOW TO REMOVE BLACK AND WHITE STREET PHOTO

There is no more classics than black and white street photography. Old street photos enliven the nostalgic images of Andre Cartes, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Duano and many others.
Why black and white street photography?
Of course, in the past, when a photograph was just beginning to develop, it was exclusively monochrome. Therefore, when we think about street photography (in the classical sense), it is black and white frames that come to mind. When color photography appeared, it was used for most amateur shots and was not perceived as “serious art”, unlike black and white.
There are other times. Modern digital cameras provide impressive image quality, and post-processing can work wonders. However, black and white photography still has a special charm. It attracts with its simplicity, minimalism and the absence of distractions and disorder. B & W photo out of fashion – timeless aesthetics.
Monochrome frames give us the opportunity to focus on the essence of the scene – the color can simply distract the viewer. We offer you some tips and suggestions from the famous street photographer Eric Kim for shooting black and white street photography.
It is worth looking for, for example, the following:
the contrast between lights and darkness
shapes and lines
expressions of emotions (on the face, as well as using body language)
eye contact
minimalism
nostalgic elements.
Obviously, we do not see the world in black and white, for this is worth training eyes.
If you are shooting on a digital camera, take JPEG JPEG + RAW (with a pre-set monochrome mode). If you’re shooting on film, just use black and white.
Putting yourself in such a creative frame, you will see your surroundings in black and white and begin to pre-visualize future monochrome shots. Try not to switch between black and white and color shots during this year of study. Otherwise, you will never sharpen your “monochrome” vision.
Another clue: if you are shooting JPEG + RAW, be sure to resort to pre-setting the black and white mode when importing photos to your computer.
Always try to simplify the black and white frame. Aim to make the scene as less complex as possible, with simple composition. Try to use single objects (at least for a start).
When you’re getting ready to shoot the street, start from the background. A good starting point could be a completely white, gray or black background. Then wait for the appearance of suitable objects in the frame.
Learn to ignore the colors that people wear. Rather, ask yourself: “What would this color look like if it were turned into monochrome?” This will help you see the world according to different brightness and shades of gray, not color.
During the month, try to remove all the excess from your photos.
When analyzing the images you want to capture, think about what you can extract from the image, and not about what you can, on the contrary, add. And when you create a composition, ask yourself: “Is this element really obliged to be in my frame?” Try to clear the images and leave only their essence in the frame.
That is, it can be said that less, in this case, is more. Or remember the motto: “less, but better.”
No one can previously accurately imagine a monochrome image. If a photo is taken on film, the photographer has less control over how the final image will look. Shooting with a digital camera and RAW, by contrast, provides tons of control over the final view of the monochrome image. If a black and white JPEG is shot, the photographer will have the same limitation as when shooting on film.
Take off against the light. Try experimenting with black-and-white exposure compensation. Try to make exposure compensation +1, +2, -1, -2 and study the results.
Study the work of masters of black and white photography
Analyze the pictures and see how the photographers build the composition. In addition, try to figure out what the pictures “work” and what doesn’t.

ART OF ENAMEL
The history of artistic enameling, as well as the art of jewelry, has a history of more than three thousand years. When and where was the enameling performed for the…

...

LENINGRAD PAINTING SCHOOL
The history of the Leningrad school of painting covers the period from the early 1930s to the early 1990s. Having emerged in an atmosphere of intense struggle over the development…

...