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4 epochs of the history of poetry

Four eras can be distinguished in the history of the world:
– Iron Age;
– the golden age;
– silver Age;
– copper age.
The Iron Age is, according to Thomas Love Peacock, the pre-writing period of poetry. This is the period when rude bards in a primitive poetic form glorified their leaders. Accordingly, almost all the poetry existing in this epoch consisted in panegyrics and brief historical excursions put on rhyme. The poets of the Iron Age glorified certain acts of warriors and prominent personalities. In other words, the poets of the time were the only historians and chroniclers. Some poets, possessing rather superficial knowledge of the history of spirits and gods, used the glory of oracles among the people, which allowed them to be not only historians, but also theologians and moralists whom they listened to.
The golden age of the history of poetry is deeply rooted in the Iron Age. This era begins at a time when poetry begins to be retrospective and when personal power and courage become insufficient to become the head of state. People at this time interval are already becoming more enlightened and are beginning to notice that the influence that spirits and gods supposedly have on their lives is not so great as is stated in the songs and legends of their ancestors. During this period, it is no longer customary to praise the well-being of monarchs in poetry, so as not to be accused of flattery and sneaky, so poets went the other way. Poets began to praise the ancestors of the monarch, while depicting the monarch a worthy successor to their ancestors. Thus, we see that the theme of poetry does not change much and traditional national poetry continues to be recreated again and again, but already clothed with new, more poetic forms. The interests of poetry in the golden age of its development become a little deeper, the fantasy more unrestrained, and the characters stronger. In other words, the poetry of the golden age becomes art to a much greater extent. Now she demands from her creator a high level of mastery, subtle knowledge of the language and a fairly extensive general knowledge of the world. Poetry is subject to all other types of mental activity of people and reaches a level that is simply impossible to exceed. All the greatest minds of that period of history indulge in poetry, and the people reverently heed the word of the poet. It was during this period that the great Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, etc., worked.
Then comes the silver age, otherwise called by Thomas Love Peacock the era of the poetry of a civilized society. During this period of its development, poetry is represented by two main types: imitative poetry and original poetry (for example, Virgil). Imitative poetry is engaged in polishing the poetry of the golden age, and the original is developing in didactic, satirical and didactic directions. A vivid example of the latter is the work of such great poets as Menander, Aristophanes, Horace and Juvenal. The poetry of the Silver Age is largely characterized by refinement and exactingness in the choice of linguistic means of expressing poetic thought, but at the same time there is a certain monotony and monotony. As a result, for the silver age of the history of poetry is characterized by a large number of poetic experiences, but at the same time almost zero number of masterpieces. However, it should be noted that this period of the history of poetry is a big step forward towards its final degeneration and disappearance.
Thus, it is quite logical that the silver age is replaced by the copper age of the development of poetry, which, completely abandoning the sophistication and refinement of the silver age, using the coarse means of the iron age, calls for a return to the roots and being able to revive the golden age. This period coincided with the decline of the Roman Empire. The Bronze Age of history did not last long and was replaced by the era of the dark Middle Ages, when the tribes that had invaded the Roman Empire returned Europe during the period of barbarism, with the small difference that there were many books in the world at that time.
Poetry has not received further development, and up to today in one or another variation repeats the stages of its development that have already been passed, starting with the iron one and ending with the copper one, most often, however, bypassing the golden era.
As for the present, Thomas Love Peacock claims that she is in complete decline, and the modern poet is nothing more than a semi-barbarian in a civilized society, his movement is reversed and unresponsive to anything new. He lives yesterday, harmonizing all his views, feelings and associations in full accordance with barbaric customs.

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